Queering Parenthood
Queering Parenthood
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Community Resources

For LGBTQ Families

LGBTQ Parenting Network

LGBTQ Parenting Network is a program of the Sherbourne Health Centre, that supports LGBTQ parenting through training, research, resource development and community organizing. They have a ton of resources of a variety of topics, including adoption, insemination & infertility.

Celebrating the "Other" Parent: Mental Health and Wellness of Expecting Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Non-Birth Parents

Lesbian, bisexual, and queer (LBQ) nonbirth parents have a unique role in the parenting spectrum. The term nonbirth parent refers to the expecting, nonpregnant partner. Previous work suggests that there are unique mental health stressors for LBQ nonbirth parents; however, research addressing this topic is scant. This paper explored the factors that affect mental health and wellness in LBQ nonbirth parents during pregnancy. Results are organized into four themes: biology, connectedness, and relatedness; social recognition; social support; and changes during pregnancy. This study has important implications for clinical practice, policy development, and health promotion activities.

Mothering on the Margins

Funded by CIHR, The Mothering on the Margins (MOMs) project was a research study carried out by researchers at the CAMH and the LGBTQ Parenting Network. One of the goals of this research was to learn about the factors that contribute to emotional well being in LGBT mothers and mothers-to-be. Some some outcomes include:

Transforming Family

Launched to respond to transphobic practices in fertility clinics and the legal system, this report aims to fill an important gap in knowledge by documenting the impact of transphobia on trans parents and drawing attention to the strengths that they bring to parenting.

Creating Our Families: A pilot study of the experiences of LGBT people accessing assisted human reproduction services in Ontario

Many LGBTQ people choose to parent. However, many LGBTQ people must rely on outside assistance to create their families, including use of assisted human reproduction (AHR) services. As a result, LGBTQ people make up a significant proportion of AHR service users in some parts of Canada. This study launched in 2010 to learn about their experiences with AHR services and to identify perceived barriers and supports to AHR service access for LGBTQ people. Some outcomes include:


For Service Providers

Lesbian Health Guidelines

Lesbian Health Guidelines is a policy brief that sets out guidelines for physicians and allied healthcare providers. The brief gives an overview of lesbian culture and lifestyle, a historical context, mental health issues, assault and sexual abuse as well as key takeaways on pregnancy and parenthood.

Practice Guidelines for LGB Clients

Practice Guidelines for LGB Clients is intended to inform the practice of psychologists and to provide information for the education and training of psychologists regarding LGB issues.

Rainbow Health Ontario

Rainbow Health Ontario works to improve access to services and promote the health of LGBTQ communities and are a valuable resource for community groups, service providers, researchers and policy makers. RHO delivers training to health and social service providers across Ontario on a variety of LGBTQ health related topics. Find out more.

The Oxford Handbook of Perinatal Psychology

The Oxford Handbook of Perinatal Psychology (Wenzel, 2016) is the most comprehensive resource to date on perinatal psychology. Ch.30 provides an overview of the Perinatal Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender people, written by Lori Ross and Abbie Goldberg.

This chapter aims to educate scholars and practitioners about the context of LGBT parenting and perinatal psychology in LGBT people to further research on this population, as well as to ensure provision of appropriate care during the perinatal period. This chapter begins by providing an overview of the minority stress framework, a theoretical framework that is useful in understanding the mental health concerns of LGBT people. The chapter then discusses language and definitional issues, providing a brief glossary of key terms necessary for culturally competent work with LGBT people. Next an overview is provided in the ways in which LGBT people are forming families in contemporary society. The body of the chapter reviews existing literature on the transition to parenthood and perinatal mental health experiences of LGBT people and closes with some conclusions and future directions for research that follow from existing literature.

Key words: lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, parenting, perinatal, minority stress.

If you would like to know more about this book chapter, please e-mail Lori Ross at l.ross@utoronto.ca

Mothering on the Margins

Funded by CIHR, The Mothering on the Margins (MOMs) project was a research study carried out by researchers at the CAMH and the LGBTQ Parenting Network. One of the goals of this research was to learn more about what services LGBT mothers and mothers-to-be find helpful and what services they wish existing to addressed their emotional needs. Some some outcomes include:

Transforming Family

Launched to respond to transphobic practices in fertility clinics and the legal system, this report aims to fill an important gap in knowledge by documenting the impact of transphobia on trans parents and drawing attention to the strengths that they bring to parenting.

Creating Our Families: A pilot study of the experiences of LGBT people accessing assisted human reproduction services in Ontario

Many LGBTQ people choose to parent. However, many LGBTQ people must rely on outside assistance to create their families, including use of assisted human reproduction (AHR) services. As a result, LGBTQ people make up a significant proportion of AHR service users in some parts of Canada. This study launched in 2010 to learn about their experiences with AHR services and to identify perceived barriers and supports to AHR service access for LGBTQ people. Some outcomes include:


For Researchers

Designing and Conducting Mixed Methods Research (Creswell & Plano, 2011)

A useful resource for scholars interested in conducting mixed methods research, and walks readers through the entire research process, from formulating questions to designing and collecting data and interpreting results.

The Mixed Methods International Research Association

The Mixed Methods International Research Association is an exciting new professional association created to promote the development of an international and interdisciplinary mixed-methods research community.

An account from the inside: Examining the emotional impact of qualitative research through the lens of "insider" research

An account from the inside: Examining the emotional impact of qualitative research through the lens of "insider" research (Ross, in press, Qualitative Psychology) speaks to the benefits and challenges of insider position as someone who considers themselves as a "total insider". On the basis of this experience, emotional-related benefits are highlighted for establishing rapport and capacity to emphasize. Challenges are also highlighted that speak to emotional investment in the researcher-participant relationship and the difficulties in managing appropriately boundaried relationships and making decisions about self-disclosure. This paper has not yet been published so we cannot link to anything, but if you would like more info, you can contact Lori Ross at l.ross@utoronto.ca.

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Lori Ross
Health Sciences Building
155 College Street, Suite 560
Toronto, ON nbsp;M5T 3M7
Phone: 1.416.978.7514
E-mail: l.ross@utoronto.ca

Dalla Lana School of Public Health
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Saint Michaels Hospital
Midwives Collective of Toronto
Community Midwives of Toronto

DISCLAIMER: Information on this site is not to be used for diagnosis, treatment or referral services and CAMH does not provide diagnostic, treatment or referral services through the Internet. Individuals should contact their personal physician, and/or their local addiction or mental health agency for further information.

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